7000-series Gallery

cta7000s_rendering-Ext01.jpg (131k)
Computer-generated rendering of the proposed 7000-series railcars shows what the exterior of the cars is proposed to look like. The sides generally resemble the previous 5000-series cars (as well as their 3200-series predecessors), but the end cap is a new design intended to give the cars a more modern and streamlined appearance. (Image courtesy of CTA)

cta7000s_rendering-Ext02.jpg (118k)
An artist's rendering of the 7000-series 'L' cars shows the side of the proposed cars. Generally, it is the same as the previous 5000-series cars, with its 'fishbelly' curved profile, fluted lower side panels, and hopper windows, as well as the same arrangement of outside signal lights, speakers, vents, and grab-bars. Other graphic details, such as the placement of the CTA logo and the use of amber LED destination signs instead of full-color LED signs, can probably be taken as artistic license, and not literal. (Image courtesy of CTA)
cta7000s_rendering-Ext03.jpg (116k)
This artist's rendering of the front end of the proposed 7000-series railcars show the new end cap that was proposed by CSR America, giving the cars a more modern appearance that is markedly different than its predecessors, but similar to many contemporary car orders for other major rapid transit systems. The arrangement of the headlights is not only different, but note that there are only two marker lights on each side instead of four -- presumably, one is red (for when it is the rear of the train, as is current procedure) and the other can produce the other three colors necessary (white, green and amber). Although the LED destination sign is shown as being monochrome, presumably it will be full-color as the 5000s' are to produce the line color backgrounds. (Image courtesy of CTA)
cta7000s_rendering-Int01.jpg (178k)
An interior view of the proposed 7000-series railcars is shown in an artist's rendering looking down the aisle from the front toward the rear of the car. The three sections of the car -- between the ends and the nearest side doors, and between the two sets of side doors -- each have a different seating configuration: from the front, in the foreground, to the rear, the cars have a section of longitudinal seating (like the 5000s), a section of 2 x 1 seating (like the 3200s) in the middle, and a section of 2 x 2 seating (like the 2600s and others) in the rear section. Note the spring-loaded New York-style hand holds in the ceiling in the door areas, and the digital screen over the aisle in the middle. Different renderings show different seat insert colors; this concept shows blue inserts. (Image courtesy of CTA)
cta7000s_rendering-Int02.jpg (150k)
An artist's rendering of the proposed 7000-series car interior shows the rear section of the car, between the #4 side doors and the #2 (rear) end of the car. A set of double aisle-facing seats are on either side of the doors, as on all other car series, and the rear section has 2 x 2 seating, e.g. double-seats on both sides of the aisle. Note that the modest panels next to the doors don't extend all the way to the floor, giving the interior a more open feel and making the area by the doors seem less closed off. (Image courtesy of CTA)
cta7000s_rendering-Int03.jpg (147k)
A digitally-generated conceptual view of the interior of the 7000-series shows what the middle section of the car, between the two sets of side doors, is proposed to look like. This section of the car has 2 x 1 seating, with double seats on one side of the aisle and single seats on the other, switching halfway through the section. The seats nearest to the front of the car are flip seats for wheelchair securement. This rendering shows purple seat inserts, one of three color variants shown in different renderings. Note the digital screen over the aisle, in the top right. (Image courtesy of CTA)
cta7000s_rendering-Int04.jpg (140k)
This conceptual rendering of the 7000-series railcar interior looks toward the front of the car and the motorcab. This section of the car has aisle-facing longitudinal seats. An LED panel in the end bulkhead provides visual messaging to complement the prerecorded audio announcements, for ADA-compliance. Note the spring-loaded New York-style hand holds in the ceiling in the door areas, and that the modest panels next to the doors don't extend all the way to the floor, giving the interior a more open feel. (Image courtesy of CTA)
cta7000s_rendering-Int05.jpg (84k)
A artist's rendering giving a conceptual view of the interior of the 7000-series railcars is a detail view of the ceiling, showing recessed lighting along the sides supplemented by a unique type of the light fixture in the center -- whether it would actually have a CTA logo on it is yet to be seen -- as well as security cameras and stanchions. (Image courtesy of CTA)